Leo Triplet


Description

The Leo Triplet (also known as the M66 Group) is a small group of galaxies about 35 million light-years away in the constellation Leo. This galaxy group consists of the spiral galaxies M65, M66, and NGC 3628.

M65 was discovered by Charles Messier and included in his Messier Objects list. However, William Henry Smyth accidentally attributed the discovery to Pierre Méchain in his popular 19th century astronomical work A Cycle of Celestial Objects (stating "They [M65 and M66] were pointed out by Méchain to Messier in 1780"). This error was in turn picked up by Kenneth Glyn Jones in Messier's Nebulae and Star Clusters. This has since ramified into a number of other books by a variety of authors.

Messier 66 (also known as NGC 3627) is an intermediate spiral galaxy. It was discovered by Charles Messier in 1780. M66 is about 95 thousand light-years across with striking dust lanes and bright star clusters along sweeping spiral arms.

NGC 3628, also known as the Hamburger Galaxy or Sarah's Galaxy is an unbarred spiral galaxy. It was discovered by William Herschel in 1784. It has an approximately 300,000 light-years long tidal tail. Its most conspicuous feature is the broad and obscuring band of dust located along the outer edge of its spiral arms, effectively transecting the galaxy to our view.

Equipment and processing

Telescope: Orion 8" F5

Mount: Orion Atlas

Camera: ST 8300M

Filters: Baader Ha,SII,OIII 7nm

Guiding: PHD

Processing: PixInsight

Capture software: Maxim

Exposures: L: Bin1 80x300, RGB: Bin2 40x300

Location: Parsippany,NJ

Rozette Nebula


Description

The Rosette Nebula (also known as Caldwell 49) is a large, spherical (circular in appearance), HII region located near one end of a giant molecular cloud in the Monoceros region of the Milky Way Galaxy. The open cluster NGC 2244 (Caldwell 50) is closely associated with the nebulosity, the stars of the cluster having been formed from the nebula's matter. The cluster and nebula lie at a distance of some 5,000 light-years from Earth and measure roughly 50 light years in diameter. The radiation from the young stars excites the atoms in the nebula, causing them to emit radiation themselves producing the emission nebula we see. The mass of the nebula is estimated to be around 10,000 solar masses.

Equipment and processing

Telescope: Orion 8" F5

Mount: Orion Atlas

Camera: ST 8300M

Filters: Baader Ha,SII,OIII 7nm

Guiding: PHD

Processing: PixInsight

Capture software: Maxim

Exposures: Ha: bin1 46x600 OIII: bin2 38x600 SII: bin1 41x600

Location: Parsippany,NJ

Monkey Head Nebula


Description

NGC 2174 (also known as Monkey Head Nebula) is an H II emission nebula located in the constellation Orion and is associated with the open star cluster NGC 2175. It is thought to be located about 6,400 light-years away from Earth. The nebula may have formed through hierarchical collapse.

Equipment and processing

Telescope: Orion 8" F5

Mount: Orion Atlas

Camera: ST 8300M

Filters: Baader Ha,SII,OIII 7nm

Guiding: PHD

Processing: PixInsight

Capture software: Maxim

Exposures: Ha: bin1 27x600 OIII: bin2 22x600 SII: bin2 8x600

Location: Parsippany,NJ

Heart and Soul Nebulas


Description

Located in the Perseus Arm of the Galaxy, the Heart nebula (left) and the Soul nebula (right) are two bright nebulae (although a telescope is needed to see them) in a region of the Galaxy where a lot of stars are forming. IC 1805 (the Heart nebula) is also sometimes called the 'Running Dog nebula' because it is said to resemble a running dog when viewed through a telescope. The distance to these two nebulae are well determined, mainly because they have star clusters at the centre of them. (It is much easier to determine the distance to a nebula if it has star clusters in it). The Heart and Soul nebulae are located in the Perseus Arm of the Galaxy 6000 and 6500 light years away. This part of the Perseus Arm has a lot of star formation regions and there are many young star clusters in this region.

Equipment and processing

Telescope: 135mm F2.8 lens

Mount: Meade LXD75

Camera: ST 8300M

Filters: Baader Ha,SII,OIII 7nm

Guiding: PHD

Processing: PixInsight

Capture software: Maxim

Exposures: Ha: bin1 20x600 OIII: bin1 20x600 SII: bin1 20x600

Location: Parsippany,NJ

Fish Head Nebula


Description

IC 1795 is also known as a Fish Head Nebula. It's a star forming region in the northern constellation Cassiopeia at distance of about 6000 light years. IC 1795 is a part of the large nebula complex known as IC 1805, the Heart Nebula.

Equipment and processing

Telescope: Orion 8" F5

Mount: Orion Atlas

Camera: ST 8300M

Filters: Baader Ha,SII,OIII 7nm

Guiding: PHD

Processing: PixInsight

Capture software: Maxim

Exposures: Ha: bin1 60x600 OIII: bin1 60x600 SII: bin2 50x600

Location: Parsippany,NJ

Pacman Nebula


Description

NGC 281 is an HII region in the constellation of Cassiopeia and part of the Perseus Spiral Arm. It includes the open cluster IC 1590, the multiple star HD 5005, and several Bok globules. Colloquially, NGC 281 is also known as the Pacman Nebula for its resemblance to the video game character.

The nebula was discovered in August 1883 by E. E. Barnard, who described it as "a large faint nebula, very diffuse." The multiple star HD 5005, also called beta1, was discovered by S. W. Burnham. It consists of an 8th-magnitude primary with four companions at distances between 1.4 and 15.7 seconds of arc. There has been no appreciable change in this quintuple system since the first measurements were made in 1875.

Equipment and processing

Telescope: Orion 8" F5

Mount: Orion Atlas

Camera: ST 8300M

Filters: Baader Ha,SII,OIII 7nm

Guiding: PHD

Processing: PixInsight

Capture software: Maxim

Exposures: Ha: bin1 25x600 OIII: bin2 50x600 SII: bin2 50x600

Location: Parsippany,NJ

Cassiopeia and Cepheus


Description

This image shows a region between Cassioeia and Cepheus which contains multiple objects.

One the left and slightly below center located Cave Nebula, Sh2-155 or Caldwell 9, a dim and very diffuse bright nebula within a larger nebula complex containing emission, reflection, and dark nebulosity. It is located in the constellation Cepheus.

Visually it is a difficult object, but with adequate exposure, makes a striking image. The nebula gets its name Cave Nebula from the dark lane at the eastern side abutting the brightest curve of emission nebulosity which gives the appearance of a deep cave when seen through a telescope visually

In the center located NGC 7538 which is about 9,100 light-years from Earth. It is home to the biggest yet discovered protostar which is about 300 times the size of our Solar System. It is located in the Perseus Spiral Arm of the Milky Way and is probably part of the Cassiopeia OB2 complex. It is a region of active star formation including several luminous near-IR and far-IR sources

Slightly to the right of NGC 7538 located famous Bubble nebula, also known as NGC 7635, Sharpless 162, or Caldwell 11, which is a H II region emission nebula in the constellation Cassiopeia. It lies close to the direction of the open cluster Messier 52. The "bubble" is created by the stellar wind from a massive hot, 8.7 magnitude young central star, SAO 20575 (BD+60 2522). The nebula is near a giant molecular cloud which contains the expansion of the bubble nebula while itself being excited by the hot central star, causing it to glow. It was discovered in 1787 by William Herschel. The star SAO 20575 or BD+602522 is thought to have a mass of 10-40 Solar masses.

Below Bubble nebula located Messier 52 (also known as M 52 or NGC 7654) which is an open cluster in the Cassiopeia constellation. It was discovered by Charles Messier in 1774. M52 can be seen from Earth with binoculars.

Due to interstellar absorption of light, the distance to M 52 is uncertain, with estimates ranging between 3,000 and 7,000 light years. One study identified 193 probable members of the cluster, with the brightest member being magnitude 11. Messier 52 is evaluated at about 35 million years old.

Above Bubble nebula located the Claw Nebula, also known as Sh2 -157, which is an emission nebula. It is located on the arm of Perseus and is directly connected with the largest association OB Cassiopeia OB2 . The northern part of the cloud has a ring shape, caused by the action of stellar wind of several giant stars, while the southern sector seems excited by light of the stars of spectral type O.

Equipment and processing

Telescope: 135mm F2.8 lens

Mount: Meade LXD55

Camera: ST 8300M

Filters: Baader HaRGB

Guiding: PHD

Processing: PixInsight

Capture software: Maxim

Exposures: Ha: Bin1 24x1200, RGB: Bin1 24x120

Location: Hatteras,NC

Cocoon Nebula


Description

IC 5146 (also Caldwell 19, Sh 2-125, and the Cocoon Nebula) is a reflection/emission nebula and Caldwell object in the constellation Cygnus. The NGC description refers to IC 5146 as a cluster of 9.5 mag stars involved in a bright and dark nebula. The cluster is also known as Collinder 470. It is located near the naked-eye star Pi Cygni, the open cluster NGC 7209 in Lacerta, and the bright open cluster M39. The cluster is about 4,000 ly away, and the central star that lights it formed about 100,000 years ago; the nebula is about 12 arcmins across, which is equivalent to a span of 15 light years.

Equipment and processing

Telescope: Orion 8" F5

Mount: Orion Atlas

Camera: ST 8300M

Filters: Baader LRGB

Guiding: PHD

Processing: PixInsight

Capture software: Maxim

Exposures: L: Bin1 14x300, RGB: Bin2 7x300

Location: Stokes State forest

NGC7331 and Stephen's Quintet - 8in scope


Description

NGC 7331 (also known as Caldwell 30) is a spiral galaxy about 40 megalight-years (12 Mpc) away in the constellation Pegasus. It was discovered by William Herschel in 1784. NGC 7331 is the brightest member of the NGC 7331 Group of galaxies. The galaxy is similar in size and structure to the galaxy we inhabit, and is often referred to as "the Milky Way's twin", although recent discoveries regarding the structure of the Milky Way may call this similarity into doubt

Stephan's Quintet in the constellation Pegasus is a visual grouping of five galaxies of which four form the first compact galaxy group ever discovered. The group was discovered by Edouard Stephan in 1877 at Marseille Observatory. The group is the most studied of all the compact galaxy groups. The brightest member of the visual grouping is NGC 7320 that is shown to have extensive H II regions, identified as red blobs, where active star formation is occurring.

Equipment and processing

Telescope: Orion 8" F5

Mount: Orion Atlas

Camera: ST 8300M

Filters: Baader LRGB

Guiding: PHD

Processing: PixInsight

Capture software: Maxim

Exposures: L: Bin1 26x300, RGB: Bin1 17x300

Location: UACNJ,Parsippany NJ

NGC1333


Description

NGC 1333 is a reflection nebula located in the constellation Perseus. It belongs to the Perseus molecular cloud.

In 2011 researchers reported finding 30 to 40 brown dwarf objects in the cloud and in the Rho Ophiuchi cloud complex

Equipment and processing

Telescope: Orion 8" F5

Mount: Orion Atlas

Camera: ST 8300M

Filters: Baader LRGB

Guiding: PHD

Processing: PixInsight

Capture software: Maxim

Exposures: L: Bin1 25x300, RGB: Bin2 6x300

Location: UACNJ